What does your practice (sadhana) look like if you're too busy?

Posted by Sharleen Oborowsky

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Sharleen Oborowsky is an entrepreneur, free spirit, soulful yogi, and mother, anchored in her joie de vivre. Sharleen co-founded Yogapedia in the summer of 2015 and is presently CEO. Yogapedia for her is more about her sadhana (practice) than business and she only writes when she’s in a meditative state. When she’s not doing yoga, she’s working on her businesses as well as raising her three beautiful children.

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Q:

What does your practice (sadhana) look like if you're too busy?

A:

For those of us who are householders, as opposed to yogis meditating in caves all day and night, the time for sadhana, or daily spiritual practice, can look like a lot of different things. If you’re busy running a business, raising a family, or simply living as a human in the modern world, you’re probably a very busy person, and a busy person’s personal sadhana practice probably looks a lot like this:

You have 50 million things to do in a given day (or so it seems), but your spiritual practice is something that allows you to get all the tasks done that you need to accomplish each day. So, your 20-minute morning meditation practice is non-negotiable. This is the time when you set the tone for your day. You voice your intentions for your day and for your life, and you get calm, centered and mentally prepared for your work day – whether that’s a nine-to-five job, staying at home with your children, or going to your home office to create a beautiful piece of writing or other work of art.

Perhaps you practice yoga at your local studio three times a week – after work twice a week and in the morning on Saturdays. This might be your sadhana practice, and it works for you because you know exactly where and when you’ll get that yoga class in. You love it and it nourishes your body, mind and soul.

The busy person’s sadhana might also look like meditating for five minutes in the morning, five minutes in the afternoon and five minutes at night. Taking small meditation breaks throughout the day is all you have time for, but it fills you up in amazing ways. Then you practice a 20-minute office yoga video online while you’re on your lunch break. It’s the perfect way to get centered before moving on with the remainder of your day.

The busy person’s sadhana will look different from one individual to the next, and it’s best to always do what works for you – depending upon your busy schedule on any given day. Even the smallest amount of practice is enough because it’s right for you that day!

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