Dwapara Yuga

Definition - What does Dwapara Yuga mean?

In Hinduism and yogic philosophy, Dwapara Yuga is the third age of the world cycle of yugas. The term comes from the Sanskrit, dwapara, meaning “two ahead,” and yuga, meaning “age” or "era."

Dwapara Yuga is the age in which humanity shows its first significant decline in righteousness. Dwapara Yuga is followed by Kali Yuga, which leads to the destruction of the world and then the creation of a new cycle of the four yugas. The prevailing belief is that the world is in Kali Yuga, but some scholars have argued Dwapara Yuga is the current era.

Yogapedia explains Dwapara Yuga

Also called the Bronze Age, the Dwapara Yuga saw the decline of morality and of the spiritual practice of yoga. As people drifted farther from the Divine, they became more competitive, zealous, deceitful and pleasure-seeking. The standard of living decreased during this yuga, but science flourished. Dwapara Yuga was also the age of the events in the epic, "Mahabharata," including the incarnation of Krishna and his role in the battle against evil. Dwapara Yuga ended when Krishna left Earth to return to his eternal home.

In chronological order, the yugas are:

  • Satya Yuga – Also known as Krita Yuga, this is the age of truth, virtue and righteousness. Everyone was said to have practiced yoga for spiritual understanding.
  • Treta Yuga – This is the age of mankind and represents a one-quarter decline in spirituality and the spiritual practice of yoga.
  • Dwapara Yuga – In this age, spirituality continues to decline, virtue and sin show up in equal measure.
  • Kali Yuga – The age of conflict, Kali Yuga is described as one quarter virtue and three-fourths sin.

Email Newsletter

Join thousands of others with our weekly newsletter