Tse Mudra

Definition - What does Tse Mudra mean?

Tse Mudra is a sacred hand gesture or 'seal,' known for treating depression and anxiety, as well as helping to overcome stress and attract good fortune. Since it combines breath with movement, it is a very stimulating practice which helps to clear negative energy and activate energetic pathways in the body.

Follow these steps to practice tse mudra:

  1. Find a stable sitting posture.
  2. Place both hands on your thighs with palms facing up.
  3. On both hands, place the tips of the thumbs at the base of the little fingers.
  4. Encircle the thumbs with all four fingers whilst slowly inhaling through your nose.
  5. Hold your breath, and silently chant 'Om' seven times in your mind.
  6. As you slowly exhale, draw in the abdominal wall and open your hands, imagining all worries, stress, fear and anxiety leaving your body.

Repeat this exercise at least seven times in a row, and up to 49 times per day.

Tse mudra is also known as the 'Exercise of the Three Secrets' or ahdi mudra.

Tse mudra

Yogapedia explains Tse Mudra

Tse mudra is recommended by Taoist Monks, who believe that this practice can chase away sadness, fear and misfortune. It is particularly useful for those with anxiety or depression, as it instills a sense of calm and clarity. Since it can be practiced anywhere and at any time of day, it is a useful tool for those in need of a quick stress release.

Unhealthy mental states can be attributed to an imbalance of the water element in the body. Practicing tse mudra is thought to re-balance and re-charge the water element, and it can therefore be useful in treating all problems associated with the kidneys and bladder.

During These Times of Stress and Uncertainty Your Doshas May Be Unbalanced.

To help you bring attention to your doshas and to identify what your predominant dosha is, we created the following quiz.

Try not to stress over every question, but simply answer based off your intuition. After all, you know yourself better than anyone else.

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