Tulsidas

Definition - What does Tulsidas mean?

Tulsidas (c. 1532-1623), also known as Goswami Tulsidas, was a Hindu poet who is best known as the author of the "Ramcharitmanas," which is an adaptation of the epic poem, "Ramayana." He was also an ascetic, a philosopher and a devoted Vaishnavite in the Smarta tradition.

Some Hindus regard Tulsidas so highly that they believe he was an incarnation of Valmiki, who was purported to be the author of the "Ramayana." Most of what is known about Tulsidas' life is legend. There's little consensus about the details, even whether he was married or single.

Yogapedia explains Tulsidas

Tulsidas is believed to be the author of 12 works altogether, including "Vinaya Patrika," which speaks against nine vices and six passions, and "Krishna Gitavali," composed of songs in honor of Lord Krishna.

The "Ramcharitmanas," which means “lake of the deeds of Rama,” praises Rama, who is believed to be an incarnation of Vishnu, the supreme god in Vaishnavism (one of Hinduism's major traditions). It focuses on loving devotion, or bhakti.

Legend has it that both Rama and the monkey god, Hanuman, appeared to Tulsidas, a claim bolstered by hints in his works of such meetings.

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