Revolved One-Legged Headstand

Definition - What does Revolved One-Legged Headstand mean?

Revolved one-legged headstand is an advanced variation of headstand that requires balance; the strength to hold a twist and a partial split while also holding a headstand; and breath control.

This pose can be entered from headstand, by initiating a twist. The yogi will press into the forearms, engage the abdominals and twist the lower body to the right or left, away from the upper body. Once in the twist, one leg is lowered, along the midline toward the floor. The foot can either float in the air, or come down to the floor for stability. For balance, the twist should be performed on both sides.

Revolved one-legged headstand is also known as parivrtta eka pada sirsasana in Sanskrit.

Revolved One-Legged Headstand

Yogapedia explains Revolved One-Legged Headstand

Inversions are not only great for flushing the lymphatic system and improving circulation to the upper extremities and brain, they also allow yogis to develop control of the breath. Twisting, when in an inversion, restricts the breath. As such, maintaining smooth and even flow of breath on both the inhale and exhale is important in this posture.

Typically, twists are initiated on an exhale, and simultaneously restrict and open the body. In revolved one-legged headstand, the arm to the side of the body that the yogi is twisting to, will open, which allows for expansion and opening of the chest. As the twist deepens, the yogi uses breath to create space between the ribs and to avoid collapse in the side waist. This is because the core has to both twist, stabilize and support the movement and opening of the leg.

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