Eka Pada Galavasana

Definition - What does Eka Pada Galavasana mean?

Eka pada Galavasana is an advanced variation of pigeon pose that is entered from utkatasana by taking one foot across the opposite thigh, bringing the palms to the floor and lifting the back leg. The name is derived from the Sanskrit, eka, meaning "one," pada, meaning "foot" or "leg," Galava, which is the name of a sage, and asana, meaning "pose."

Eka pada Galavasana is an ideal posture for building strength and courage, both physically and emotionally. It should be approached with an attitude of playfulness and curiosity, without attachment to the final posture.

Galavasana may also be referred to as flying pigeon pose in English.

Yogapedia explains Eka Pada Galavasana

Galava is said to have been the son of Vishvamitra, a famous Hindu rishi. It is part of the third series of Ashtanga yoga.

The challenging nature of eka pada Galavasana means it is also good for cultivating presence and acceptance of the moment, exactly as it shows up. It helps one to learn to accept both success and failure with equanimity. Emotionally, it is a powerful asana because it can take a yogi outside his/her comfort zone and helps to boost self-confidence. It can also bring about feelings of elation while defying gravity.

This posture and the focus and wisdom it encourages are associated with stimulating the ajna chakra. Through balancing this chakra, it is said that the yogi can progress into deeper realms on their spiritual journey, building their intuition, creativity and imagination.

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