Vimala

Definition - What does Vimala mean?

In Buddhism, vimala is the second of the 10 bhumis, or “lands” through which the bodhisattva must travel on his/her journey to becoming a buddha. It has similarities to the yogic path to enlightenment.

Vimala bhumi is described as the “land of purity” and is sometimes called "the stainless.” In this stage, the bodhisattva renounces all defilements and cultivates sila paramita, which translates as the “perfection of morality.” In vimala, the bodhisattva gains compassion for all living beings.

Yogapedia explains Vimala

Many forms of Buddhism believe in a path to enlightenment, but the journey through the 10 stages that include vimala is a key concept in Mahayana Buddhism. To these Buddhists, the bodhisattva is an enlightened and compassionate being who lives in the mortal world until all others attain enlightenment.

The stage preceding vimala is pramudita, or "land of joy." The lands that follow vimala include:

  • Prabhakari, or radiant land in which higher knowledge shines.
  • Archismati, or land of brilliance in which false conceptions are burned away.
  • Sudurjaya, or the land that's difficult to master. This stage involves deep meditation.
  • Abhimukhi, or the stage of manifesting, in which the bodhisattva finds perfection of wisdom.
  • Durangama, or land afar. At this stage, the bodhisattva acquires the ability to help others achieve enlightenment.
  • Achala, or immovable land in which the bodhisattva's mind is completely absorbed and cannot be influenced by outside distractions.
  • Sadhumati, or good wisdom. All dharmas are understood at this stage.
  • Dharmamegha, or dharma clouds. This is the final stage in which buddhahood is obtained.
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