Aryaman

Definition - What does Aryaman mean?

Aryaman is one of the names of a minor Hindu sun god, especially in the early Vedic and Devas traditions. The name is also sometimes used interchangeably with Surya, the sun god. The name comes from the Sanskrit for “sun,” but also means “companion” and “bosom friend.”

Aryaman was the third of the Adityas, or sons of Aditi, the mother of gods in Vedic literature. Depending on the tradition, there are six, eight or twelve Adityas. Aryaman was known as the “destroyer of foes,” as the “servant of dharma” or the governing principle of the universe.

Yogapedia explains Aryaman

Aryaman is believed to control time while maintaining impartiality. In Hindu marriages, Aryaman is often involved to witness the oaths. Some sources also call him the god of hospitality and chivalry from ancient times. In this role, Aryaman maintained the order of aristocratic society and its code of honor. He is usually depicted with a prayer wheel, two lotus flowers and a club.

The names of the Adityas may vary depending on the sources, and even the Puranas have different names listed. The "Brahma Purana" lists nine groups of twelve names each for the sun gods. In addition to Aryaman, a typical list of the other Adityas might include: Mitra, Varuna, Daksha, Bhaga, Amsa, Tvastr, Savitur, Pusan, Sakra, Vivasvat and Vishnu.

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