Marichi’s Pose

Definition - What does Marichi’s Pose mean?

Marichi pose is named after the sage Marichi and includes four main variations, known as Marichi pose A, B, C and D. All four variations are asymmetrical seated postures, with one leg bent up close to the groin and the body either folding forward or moving into a twist.

All of the variations of Marichi pose are included in the primary series of Ashtanga Yoga, where they are practiced in succession with a vinyasa sequence between each side and each posture.

Yogapedia explains Marichi’s Pose

The variations of Marichi Pose are entered into from staff pose as follows:

  1. Marichi pose A: One leg is outstretched in front of the body and the other is bent up, with the knee pointing upward and the sole of the foot planted on the floor with the heel close to the groin. The arm on the same side as the bent leg wraps around it, from inside to out, and the other arm reaches around the back to clasp the fingers or wrist of the opposite arm. The torso folds forward over the outstretched leg.
  2. Marichi pose B: One leg is brought into half lotus pose, then the other leg is bent up, as if coming into a squat position with the sole of the foot on the ground. The arm of the grounded leg wraps from the inside to the outside of the leg, and around the back. The other arm goes around the back so that the hand can clasp the opposite wrist. The torso then folds forward inside the vertical thigh.
  3. Marichi pose C: One leg is outstretched in front of the body and the other is bent up, with the knee pointing upward and the sole of the foot planted on the floor with the heel close to the groin. The torso twists toward the bent leg. The arm closest wraps around it to take the wrist of the opposite arm, which has reached around the back to clasp the thigh closest to the groin.
  4. Marichi pose D: One leg is brought into half lotus pose and the other is bent up, with the knee pointing upward and the sole of the foot planted on the floor with the heel close to the groin. The torso twists toward the bent leg. The arm closest wraps around it to take the wrist of the opposite arm, which has reached around the back.

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