Dwi Pada Viparita Dandasana

Definition - What does Dwi Pada Viparita Dandasana mean?

Dwi pada viparita dandasana is an advanced inverted asana that requires a great deal of flexibility, especially in the back. It is a combination of urdhva dhanurasana (wheel pose) and sirsasana (headstand).

To enter this asana, the practitioner lies face-up with the knees bent and the soles of the feet grounded hip-width apart. The palms are positioned above the shoulders, with the fingers pointing toward the body. The hips are lifted, and the crown of the head rests on the ground. The forearms are lowered and the fingers interlace behind the head, as if setting up for sirsasana. The head is then lifted off the ground, and the chest presses outward.

The name of this asana comes from the Sanskrit dwi, meaning “two," pada, meaning “foot," viparita, meaning “reversed” or “inverted," danda, meaning “staff,” and asana, meaning “pose” or “posture.” In English, this asana is known as upward facing two-foot staff pose or two-legged inverted staff pose.

Yogapedia explains Dwi Pada Viparita Dandasana

Dwi pada viparita dandasana not only stretches the spine, but is a chest and hip opener. Because it is a more advanced asana, the practitioner should first master urdhva dhanurasana and one of the headstand asanas.

Traditionally, this asana is thought to open the anahata (heart) chakra. Opening anahata is associated with compassion, acceptance, peace, self-esteem and love.

Practicing dwi pada viparita dandasana also has the following benefits:

  • Boosts concentration and focus
  • Soothes the mind and body
  • Improves posture by enhancing flexibility and elasticity
  • Stretches and strengthens the back, neck, arm and leg muscles
  • Enhances core stability, balance and endurance

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