Definition - What does Swastikasana mean?

Swastikasana is a basic seated yoga asana often used in meditation, particularly when the yogi has difficulty with siddhasana and padmasana. The name comes from the Sanskrit, su, meaning “good”; asti, meaning “to be” or “existence”; ka, meaning “to make”; and asana, meaning “pose.”

To practice this asana, bend one leg and place the foot against the inside of the opposite thigh. Then, bend the other leg and place that foot in the space between the opposite thigh and calf muscle. Grab the toes of the first leg and pull them into the space between the opposite thigh and calf muscle. The spine should remain erect, and the hands should rest on the knees in a mudra such as jnana or chin.

Swastikasana may also be referred to by its English name, auspicious pose.

Yogapedia explains Swastikasana

Swastikasana is so-named because the cross-legged position resembles a swastika, which in India is a symbol of good fortune, happiness and auspiciousness. The symbol represents the corners of the universe meeting at a common center of consciousness.

Traditionally, swastikasana is believed to open the flow of prana energy between the muladhara (root) chakra and the ajna (third eye) chakra.

Additional benefits of swastikasana include:

  • Increase in concentration
  • Rejuvenation of the nervous system
  • Calming of the mind
  • Relief from varicose veins and aching leg muscles

Yogis suffering from sciatica or those with knee pain or injury should skip this asana. The pose may be practiced while sitting on the edge of a folded blanket to ease strain on the hips.

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