Causal Body

Definition - What does Causal Body mean?

In yogic philosophy, the causal body is one of three bodies that contains each individual's soul, the others being the physical body and the astral body. The causal body is the most subtle of the three and is contained within the other two. It is the body that transports the essence of the individual from one life into the next reincarnation.

The causal body is also known by the Sanskrit term, karana sharira. It is composed of karma and samskara, which are, respectively, the record of the yogi's actions in all states of existence and the experiential impressions and imprints on the mind.

Yogapedia explains Causal Body

Each of the three bodies plays a role in transporting the Self toward moksha, which is freedom from cyclical re-birth. Yoga's purpose is to maser the energies of these three bodies, starting with the physical, then the astral and finally, the causal body.

Each body is associated with one or more koshas. The koshas are the layers of awareness that veil Atman, or true Self. Discovering each layer is believed to bring a yogi closer to oneness with the universe. The causal body contains the anandamaya kosha (bliss), where the yogi experiences calmness, peace and joy. Some traditions refer to this layer as the true Self, while others believe this kosha simply opens the door to the true Self.

A yogi connects with the causal body through the last two of the Eight Limbs of Yoga as described in Patanjali's Yoga Sutras, which are dhyana (meditation or concentration) and samadhi (superconsciousness or bliss). In the causal body, individuality exists to a minimal degree. When the yogi stops identifying with the needs and wants of the lower self, he/she allows the higher Self and truth to manifest.

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