Garima

Definition - What does Garima mean?

Garima is one of the eight supernatural powers granted to Hanuman by Sita in the Hanuman Chalisa. Garima is the ability to become infinitely heavy. It is one of the eight siddhis according to classical Hindu texts, attainable by spiritual advancement through sadhana. In Indian folklore, Hanuman often uses garima in order to warn, protect or guide others.

The Hanuman Chalisa is a sacred Hindu hymn devoted to Lord Hanuman, a devotee of Lord Rama and one of the central characters of Ramayana, an ancient Sanskit epic. Hanuman, otherwise known as the "monkey god," is the ideal example of a yogi, with characteristics of discipline, devotion and celibacy, as well as having attained complete mastery over his senses.

Yogapedia explains Garima

In the Hanuman Chalisa, Hanuman is granted eight siddhis by Sita, consort of Lord Rama and an avatar of Sri Lakshmi. Siddhi is Sanskrit for accomplishment, and refers to spiritual or supernatural powers attained by sadhana, such as meditation or yoga. Sita gives Hanuman the ability to bestow these eight siddhis upon anyone he chooses; Aṇimā (ability to become small), Mahima (ability to become big), Garima (ability to become heavy), Laghima (ability to become weightless), Prāpti (ability to be anywhere at will), Prākāmya (ability to obtain anything desired), Iṣiṭva (power over nature), Vaśitva (control over natural forces).

Garima is the siddhi of becoming infinitely heavy at will. Hanuman is said to have used this siddhi in several folklore tales, such as the story of Bhima's search for the Saugandhika flower. When Bhima encounters Hanuman, he is unable to lift the monkey's tail out of his way since it has become too heavy. As a result, Hanuman is able to warn Bhima of the dangers on his path ahead, and give him a blessing to proceed.

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